The Electric Piano Forum

General => The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano => Topic started by: tomdavids1 on March 14, 2017, 08:19:35 PM

Title: Tine not resonating on second strike
Post by: tomdavids1 on March 14, 2017, 08:19:35 PM
Hey guys, so i've been messing with the voicing settings on my rhodes lately and I've been pretty pleased with my results.

However, when I strike a key and get a freely resonating hit, if I press that same key again with the sustain pedal engaged, it won't be a freely resonant hit of the tine like the first one was.

Its almost like because the tine is still resonating when the second strike occurs, the hammer is almost acting as a damper instead of a hammer.

anyone else ever experience this and figure out what was causing it?
Title: Re: Tine not resonating on second strike
Post by: David Aubke on March 15, 2017, 06:36:18 AM
Its almost like because the tine is still resonating when the second strike occurs, the hammer is almost acting as a damper instead of a hammer.

That's exactly what it is. Nothing to be done except regard it as part of the character of the real thing as compared to a sterilized synth patch.

http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=9218.msg50222#msg50222
Title: Re: Tine not resonating on second strike
Post by: Ben Bove on March 15, 2017, 01:30:13 PM
Adding confirmation to David that it's natural.  If you can imagine, throwing a hammer up that collides with a tine that is swinging down.  It basically knocks out the kinetic energy of the swinging tine.

On the flip side, if the hammer happens to be timed right on that second strike, where it hits the tine just as it's about to swing back up, you can get a note louder than any natural first strike.

Now, if there are some escapement or strikeline adjustments needed on your piano, it might be a little more pronounced if you're getting double-striking or thunking more than normal. 
Title: Re: Tine not resonating on second strike
Post by: e-soul91 on March 20, 2017, 07:33:38 AM
Wholeheartedly agree with two people above, it is the proof that you're playing real, living Rhodes. :)

It is how its action is. I remember when my friend got to play my Rhodes for the first time in his life. He always loved that sound since he first heard it on some VST. He got all amazed at how bouncy keys are when released, and asked me if there is something wrong with that. I said, as far as I know, I would be more concerned if they didn't bounce that much. :)