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Messages - Groove4Hire

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151
Welcome to the forum Mike! It's such a privilege to have the original designers of the Mark V here with us. It was with great interest I read about the hydraulic sustainpedalsystem you tried on the Mark IV. What else can you tell us about the Mark IV?

152
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Just bought a Mark V!!!
« on: November 19, 2006, 11:04:18 AM »
I know that here in Norway the stand was sold separately and the pricetag was steep... I bought my Mark V from the original owner and he told me he couldn't afford the stand when he had paid for the piano... I found two original Mark V stands later on; the first was a new old stock Mark V stand I bought on Ebay 4 years ago for 100$... The other one I found in a messy backroom in a second hand music shop in LA. I got that one for free...

153
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / wooden hammers in a post 75' rhodes?
« on: October 27, 2006, 11:43:46 AM »
I'm sorry to tell you guys that the hammers themselves are not the reason for the tone you can find in the earlier Fender Rhoder era pianos. Just think about it for a second, the hammer strikes the tine and pulls away and let the tine ring. The secret for the earlier Fender Rhodes sound can be found in several areas of the piano, first of all the square hammertips on those earlier piano tends to crystallize and harden over the years, and that's why you have such a wonderful attack in the sound in these pianos. Second, Rhodes had several suppliers of tines through the years. Pianos made before 1975 used Torrington tines, later pianos used Schaller tines. With some experience you can hear the differences in the tone. Third (and possibly not lastly, there could be even more reasons...) you have the pickups, which have been changed though the years. The earlier pickups were larger than the later ones. All these factors combined with a good set-up of the piano is what a Rhodes sound like it does. Changing only the hammers would not give you the '75/'76 piano in my opinion. Add to that you'd have a bitch setting up the dampers to behave correctly, you'd have to drill new holes for the hammerflanges since they aren't modular like the plastic ones and much more...

154
[moderation note: this is being kept for the subsequent discussion]

Well... It's not a goldsparkle since it doesn't have the top... But this was most probably a gold sparkle piano bass. It has the serial# BA-167 and my goldsparkle bass has serial BA-0163... Now if they only could find that top...

- Jon

155
Yep, it's put on there in the factory. I've owned two Mark V and both of them had the orange sticker. Could be some sort of warranty sticker of some sort I don't know...

- Jon

156
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Mark V in general
« on: July 16, 2006, 02:46:41 AM »
Nope... That one is new to me... My Mark V is stock and I have no corrosionproblems... The one I rebuilt had obviously been storaged in a very humid place... No pickups or field reactions could generate that amount of corrosion on that piano...

- Jon

157
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Mark V in general
« on: July 15, 2006, 06:21:02 AM »
I own one and have rebuilt one... The one that I still have was in great shape when I got it, the other, while looking pretty good on the outside I was almost floored when I took off the lid. Everything was rusted, and I mean EVERYTHING... I had to rebuild the whole piano from the bottom using all new parts and it is such a pleasure to work on a Mark V. The action is great, they increased the hammerthrow to 2 inches giving it better dynamic possibilities and when set up and voiced correctly it just blows any competition out of the water... You can see pics of that rebuilt Mark V on this link: http://www.vintagebua.no/?page=pictures&productid=94&categoryid=55

If you can get one I'd recommend you to buy it. You will not regret it.

- Jon

158
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Fiesta Red Rhodes Bass?
« on: July 15, 2006, 06:12:49 AM »
I have a Goldsparkle Piano Bass but I can't make out the year on the grren print, it's all smudged out... Cool to know that it's probably from '62... And I paid 500$ for it with the top ;-) Guess I have to change the year on it in my signature..

- Jon

159
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / My Rhodescollection...
« on: July 02, 2006, 05:36:36 PM »
Quote
Out of all of 'em, which one do you like best/is the most fun to play?


Well, that's a hard one...  I love them all and they all have their strengths... But the '79 Suitcase do have a tone that just blows me away everytime I sit down and play it... The Mark II Dyno-My Piano from early 1981 is practially New Old Stock and it is one of the last Mark IIs with wooden keys and the action is unlike every other model I've tried... Looks like they rally got it together in early 1981 and then they switched to plastic keys... What a shame... The Mark V is a joy to play, so is the Percussion Pedal Dyno, both because it is set up so well and that it haven't been used much so it still sound incredibly fresh... The 1972 Suitcase take you back to Return to Forever instantly and it has a very nice action... Well, as you can see... I love them all... To ask me for a favourite is impossible... Sorry...

Quote
You could open a non profit Rhodes museum.

Funny thing you should mention that... We're actually playing with the idea... Through the years some buddies of mine and myself have been collecting vintage gear with the intention of opening up a museum/studio where people could come and see/try and even record... We're still in the very early stages of planning though...

I won't reveal too much at this point but I can reveal that if you can make it to Norway this fall, you may come and see one of the worlds most complete collections of Rhodes and Hammonds on this side of the pond...

- Jon

160
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Tightening the key bushings
« on: June 30, 2006, 06:00:48 PM »
Yes, the sloppy action is from worn felts and the best thing is to replace them BUT if you want a fast fix for it, you can use a key bushing tightener... It's a tool you insert into the hole where the guide pin or balancepin goes and give it a whack with a hammer which in turn squeezes the wood a bit closer and narrows the hole and thusly makes it tighter around the pin and voila! you don't have sloppy action anymore...

- Jon

161
The "normal" stuff like grommets, tips and all is the same but the hammers could be the ones with the white felt underneath instead of the red felt on the key pedestal... One trick to speed up the action on these is to use some regular tape on the bare pedestals.

- Jon

162
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Can anybody identify this?
« on: June 29, 2006, 12:38:29 PM »
If you try to use silicone on the pedestalfelts on a plastic key MK2 the felt will fall off... Ask me... I did it back in the days and learned the hard way... As a matter of fact, I try to avoid the use of silicone these days since I feel they give me some unwanted sideffects like hammer bounce and doublestrikes... I've ordered some liquid teflon stuff I've heard good things about but a Dremel with a nylon roundbrush can do wonders for any pedestalfelt...

- Jon

163
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Tightening the key bushings
« on: June 29, 2006, 12:28:42 PM »
I've used a keybushing tightener on several pianos I've had in for service with good results... I know that pianotechs around the world hate this tool like nothing else but keep in mind that in a piano or grand piano there are many more parts in the action which could be affected in a negative way by using such a tool... In a Rhodes with its few parts, I feel it works great... But it depends on the budget... I refelt my personal pianos and I always recommend my customers to do the same if the keys on their piano are sloppy but if they're on a tight budget (who aren't?) I tell them I can use the tightener...

- Jon

164
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / My Rhodescollection...
« on: June 29, 2006, 12:21:45 PM »
Yeah  I know, I'm such a big tease  :wink:

I will take some more pics when my girlfriend gets back from the Roskilde Festival with my digital camera (hopefully) in one piece... The harp does indeed pivot from the trebleend and the harp slides in the bassend on top of the harp supportblock. In total you can move the harp about 4-5 cm max with the kneelever. A sideffect by doing this is that you get a volumedrop. Dyno-My Piano compensates for this with a little signalbooster. This booster gets adjusted through a slide potentiometer which follows the harpmovements on the bass-side. Hard to explain this I know, I will post a picture soon... You can also use the kneelever as a volumeswell effect too... Very cool effect...

- Jon

165
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / My Rhodescollection...
« on: June 28, 2006, 06:02:24 PM »
Well, all I can do is to wish you best of luck in finding one... Dyno Rhodes are rare and the Percussion Pedal Dyno even more rare... I have stumbled across two in my lifetime... The first one didn't have the knee lever (which seems to get lost through the years, just like those darn crossbars for the legs) so I set it up like regular Dyno and the other one is the one I have now which I bought from the original owner. I was incredibly lucky... I think this is one of two Percussion Pedal Dyno Rhodes in Europe... I've heard rumours that Mike Lindup who played keyboards in Level 42 had one and used it extensively in the 80s... John Della Vecchia has one for sale I believe...

- Jon

166
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / My Rhodescollection...
« on: June 28, 2006, 04:28:23 PM »
It's a mechanism that let's you pull the harp out of the "sweetspot" with a kneelever and a wire which in turn is attached to the harp on the left side. When you move the harp towards you the hammers hit the tines on a different spot and you get more overtones and percussive sounds. It's a really cool effect and it really shows how innovative the guys at Dyno-My Piano were and how creative they were to achieve new sounds from the Rhodes piano.

- Jon

167
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / My Rhodescollection...
« on: June 28, 2006, 03:37:26 PM »
Through the years I have through lots of research and a good dose of luck gathered a nice collection of Rhodespianos... It's nothing like Kenneth Manning's collection but still, I doubt you'll find a similar collection on this side of the pond... The text is in Norwegian but I will make a gallery with English text as soon as I find the time...

The 1971 Suitcase Mark 1 is in transit from LA where I bought it from a nice gentleman who before he sold it to me had it serviced with the one and only Steve Woodyard. I will put up pics of it as soon as I get it. Please feel free to mail me with questions, I'd be happy to answer them.

Enjoy!

http://www.vintagebua.no/vintageboard/viewtopic.php?t=4

- Jon

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