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The Wurlitzer Electric Piano / Re: Reed plates
« Last post by DocWurly on July 14, 2019, 09:57:25 PM »
I would like to say, for the record, that apparently the reason I couldn't post that prior long response was because it contained the following obscene word:

v i b r a t o r s.

You don't believe me?  Try responding with a post containing that word, and see what happens.

Who set up the censoring software on this server?  :D

(Update:  Our fearless admin Cormac looked into this.  It's not software on the EP Forum board in particular, but some universal snag that was in the hosting server software.   But they fixed it.  Now we can say "vibrators.")
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The Wurlitzer Electric Piano / Re: Reed plates
« Last post by DocWurly on July 14, 2019, 08:18:26 PM »
I believe they are to help with sustain. You may remove them for tuning, but you should put them back again.

Part 2:

They aren't for sustain.  Or rather, I strongly doubt that was their intent, though I used to think so. If anything, they probably were intended to mute overtones.

They debuted in 1963 with the 140A/145A/720A series and the new reed design, and were kept through the hybrid 200/200A's of 1975.  They dropped them from the later 200A's.

They start exactly 1 octave down from the topmost "C", and cover 10 notes; so, there are 12 notes up top --one for each chromatic note in a scale--  that don't have them.

My best guess is that they were there to minimize a kind of murky rumble that can happen when you depress the dampers, which is especially audible in instruments with a lot of mass, like the 720(/A/B) and 726(B) furniture console series.  They leave an octave of notes to act as sympathetic vibra-tors, and prevent, say, the top two C's from doubling that effect unevenly.

There are two problems with them:

1) As they cover two notes each, they make tuning those notes VERY hard--It's super-tough to align the reeds in the pickup and tighten down the two screws, and get the pressure even, etc. And you can't just get the pitch right and _then_ re-add them--they can change the pitch.  You pretty much HAVE to tune those reeds flat, and do the final fine-tuning in place, with a file--if you keep them.

2) Often, especially on the 200 series, they just keep the notes from sustaining.  They are typically corroded, and maybe that's why, although I suspect they were made out of some cheap metal that distorts over time.  (I find that they don't do typically as much sustain "damage" in the early instruments that they were installed into.)

Most techs just take them out.  If I can, I keep them in the pre-200's, but usually any theoretical benefits are so minimal, so unnoticed, that it's not worth it.

(My other hypothesis is that they are there to ease the tonal transition between the treble reeds/hammers and the midrange ones. They cover all 8 of the upper-mid reed blanks, 43 to 50, and two of the lower treble blanks, 51 and 52.)
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The Wurlitzer Electric Piano / Re: Reed plates
« Last post by DocWurly on July 14, 2019, 08:12:39 PM »
I can't tell exactly what model you have there, but I see evidence, from the holes for the music posts, that it's 200 series or later.  I'd say just take them out and have no regrets.

I tried to post a longer reply but the site isn't having it.
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Other Keyboards & Software Synths / Re: Korg Poly Ensemble S
« Last post by Peter Hayes on July 14, 2019, 05:35:58 PM »
Sold.
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Other Keyboards & Software Synths / Korg Poly Ensemble S
« Last post by Peter Hayes on July 14, 2019, 12:05:59 PM »
I have a Korg Poly Ensemble S in need of a home. Needs some work. Contact me off list if interested.

Peter@elecedge.com
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The Wurlitzer Electric Piano / Re: Reed plates
« Last post by pianotuner steveo on July 13, 2019, 12:35:11 PM »
What model is it?

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The Wurlitzer Electric Piano / Re: Reed plates
« Last post by pianotuner steveo on July 13, 2019, 12:34:18 PM »
I believe they are to help with sustain. You may remove them for tuning, but you should put them back again.
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Amps, Effects & Recording Techniques / Re: Peterson stereo pan pedal?
« Last post by thetrufflehog on July 12, 2019, 12:26:26 PM »
Hi! I have played a stage piano for years but have crazy suitcase envy and probably have some helpful advice. I also have had two different nord electros, so....
- I have an old speakeasy vintage stereo panner and preamp, I think it is supposed to be closer to the peterson system, but specific information about it is incredibly hard to find and they are out of production. It is fantastic, but unfortunately I have never even seen a picture of one online, let alone one for sale.
- For a while, my panner was not working properly, I used an EHX stereo pulsar. It takes a lot of tweaking because the settings are veyr sensitive, but you can get really damn close. This is a great and inexpensive way to get the stereo pan effect.
- A big part of the sound is the preamp and your amp setup...You can probably get pretty close with any panning pedal for the stereo effect, but you really need to have some sort of preamp and the right amp/speaker system. My motion sound KP200 gets me pretty close as far as the amp part goes, though something with 12 inch speakers would be best. When using the stereo pulsar I had used an EHX LPB1 pedal to boost the signal. I was never really satisfied with it, and could probably have done better with something else mroe suited to being a preamp. But it was cheap and got the Rhodes to an acceptable volume level.
- I'm not sure what the nord is trying to emulate...to me it doesnt sound like either the Peterson or Janus. Hopefully the Nord Piano 4 lets you edit more parameters than my Electro 3 but the panner honestly isnt that great as is for me. It just sounds wrong at every setting. I love the Nord and it is the best to bring to rehearsals and smaller gigs, and is such a flexible board. Owning a real Rhodes makes me really notice the shortcomings of the Nord Rhodes sounds though, which really crop up on every different sample when you dig in. Something in the way it emulates the "bark" is really fake and thin. (Your audience will never notice though! Just my observation as a player and nitpicker).
- If you are using a Rhodes stage piano, you might like the Avion Studios Retro Flyer, but it isn't a pedal. It seems pretty slick. It replaces the namerail controls.
- Major Key makes (made?) a really nice looking preamp for stage pianos that had a stereo pan. Don't know what is going on with them or if it can be ordered right now. Their site seems to be down on all but the home page.
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The Wurlitzer Electric Piano / Reed plates
« Last post by MoonSide on July 12, 2019, 05:35:20 AM »
Hello,

I am re-tuning my wurlitzer but these plates make the exercise more complicated. What exactly are they for, is it possible to remove them?


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The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: Pickup Rewinding Question...
« Last post by groovemonkey73 on July 12, 2019, 03:01:39 AM »
Thanks for your kind words of advice pnoboy, I do really appreciate that. I've had lots of experience with soldering before, although I could still be better if I had less of a shaky hand.

I've already seen how quick you need to be given the plastic on the bobbins, so I will practice on some completely dead pickups first.

The wire I'm using is pickup wire (I'm re-winding from dead pickups where there is corrosion on the posts, or the coil winding start was broken), onto an empty pickup with better or no corrosion on the posts, so then I know it will have a good connection, and also I don't then need to count the revolutions as I'm re-winding!
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