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91
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: How to save a bad tine?
« Last post by guizmo on March 01, 2019, 01:05:47 PM »
I squared off the tine, now is perfectly square (picture).

But, it measures 60,9mm instead of 61,9mm (like written on my bedside topic https://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=9647.0). It seems to be better to have a smaller tine with the spring near the edge, so, will see (my rhodes isn't at home so, I'll maybe check next week... rrrrr).

I verified, it produced a D with the spring in the position shown in my picture.
92
Thanks for the responses.

The difficult thing to know is how “good” stock suitcases can sound. Mine (and probably most, I suspect) is very bass-y and the treble only comes out when turned all the way up and with bass all or most of the way the way down. The window for some sparkle is very small if non-existent. I do like the bass response - especially awesome for any music requiring left hand bass. But when you need to comp it’s more of a burden.

I will try a bbe sonic maximizer first in the effects loop and see what that does. Certainly one of the least expensive options.
93
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: Tine Production Dates
« Last post by guizmo on March 01, 2019, 12:03:51 PM »
Flag !!
I’m very interested !
94
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Tine Production Dates
« Last post by Tim Hodges on March 01, 2019, 07:48:43 AM »
After a recent discussion about some tines for a 1971 piano it made me think about the production dates of the different tines.

Can anyone add some more insight?

1965 - Raymacs (Un-tapered)
19XX - Raymacs (Tapered)
1970 - Torrington (Un-tapered) ??
1971 - Torrington (Tapered)
1977 - Singer (Tapered) - Started Mid 1977
1978 - Schaller (Tapered)

Tim
95
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: How to save a bad tine?
« Last post by pnoboy on March 01, 2019, 07:41:04 AM »
I agree with Sean--in my experience,  squared tine ends do not change the tone produced by the tine as far as I have been able to tell.
96
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: How to save a bad tine?
« Last post by guizmo on March 01, 2019, 07:37:36 AM »
Thanks for your answers !

I gonna try to square off, I’ll be sure like that !
Tim, the tine is #35.
There’s a sound clip on my first post, the google drive link.

Thanks

So there is, sorry me being lazy!

No problem ^^
97
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: How to save a bad tine?
« Last post by Tim Hodges on March 01, 2019, 07:36:38 AM »
Thanks for your answers !

I gonna try to square off, I’ll be sure like that !
Tim, the tine is #35.
There’s a sound clip on my first post, the google drive link.

Thanks

So there is, sorry me being lazy! From the sounds of it I don't think you're going to have much luck with that tine.

I do have some spare 1974 tines and an entire set of 1971 tines but I can't part those out as I'll be using them in an upcoming restoration.

I did see this listing for #34. You could cut off a mm or so to make it for #35.

https://reverb.com/item/5782912-vintage-fender-rhodes-later-raymac-tines-1969-1971-c-34
98
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: Hammers stay up when played hard
« Last post by pnoboy on March 01, 2019, 07:35:09 AM »
Does this occur mostly with hammers at or near the bass end?  I think this effect is latent in all Rhodes pianos.  A simple experiment all could try is this: rotate the harp up, and then while holding a key down firmly, use your hand to move a hammer from its escapement position flat against the key pedestal, up to the position where it would strike its tine and back down again.  You will feel friction.  On the bass end, where the escapement is large, and where the tine can bend quite a bit when the hammer strikes it, the hammer moves up quite a bit away from the escapement position when striking a tine.  The hammer relies on its bounce away from the tine, plus the pull of the damper as transmitted through the bridle straps to bring it back to escapement.  Any friction between the pedestal felt and the hammer plastic can inhibit this ability.  The problem you are encountering is normally much less likely to occur toward the treble end of the piano, where, because of the reduced escapement and the increased stiffness of the tines, the hammer does not move far at all from its escapement position when striking a note.  The sad fact is that the simplified action used in the Rhodes works very well toward the treble end of the piano, but much less well toward the bass end.

I believe some lubrication is often necessary, depending of course, on the felt used on the pedestal, and the condition of the plastic of the hammer.  I haven't tried it with my piano, but I suspect that stiff, dense, somewhat thin felt would be helpful, but because I haven't tried it, I can't specifically recommend it.  The idea of lubing the pedestal felt has been a contentious topic in this message board, and for that reason, I am not going to recommend any specific lubricant or course of action.  On my own piano, I have "lubed" the felt/hammer interface by modifying the surface of the hammer at the portion of the hammer where is touches the pedestal, but many might consider my solution somewhat radical, so I'm not prepared to discuss that either.
99
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: How to save a bad tine?
« Last post by guizmo on March 01, 2019, 07:24:13 AM »
Thanks for your answers !

I gonna try to square off, I’ll be sure like that !
Tim, the tine is #35.
There’s a sound clip on my first post, the google drive link.

Thanks
100
The Fender Rhodes Electric Piano / Re: How to save a bad tine?
« Last post by Tim Hodges on March 01, 2019, 07:22:29 AM »
I've found that in the mid range it gives a raspiness to the note  :)
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