Author Topic: Chemical fluids  (Read 6141 times)

Offline marcmarc

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Chemical fluids
« on: November 27, 2019, 11:10:17 AM »
Hi,
In the 200 and 200A service manual (as downloaded from Vintage Vibes) there is, page 8, this recipe :

"If the action centers become sluggish they must be treatedā€¦
The treating solution consists of 8 parts of naphtha and 1 part of silicone liquid."

So, since I have 2 keys which are sluggish, I would like to try that.
My problem is that I don't know what commercial product is "naphtha" and where to find "silicone liquid".
Bear in mind that I'm french and live in Franceā€¦

If I understand correctly, zippo lighter fluid is naphtha?
Or maybe the common "White spirit" found in french DIY stores is naphtha too?

And where do you found silicone liquid?

Well, if you know how to translate that in actual products sold in France I would be glad!

thanks

Offline OZDOC

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Re: Chemical fluids
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2019, 09:26:08 PM »

Naphtha is a petro-chemical solvent. So other solvents would be suitable as substitutes - test to see what happens.
It is apparently being used to dilute the silicone.

Silicone oil is available in all sorts of viscosities from hobby shops that deal in radio controlled cars.
Perhaps you can buy one that is already thin enough?

But perhaps you can get the correct lubricant from a European piano parts supplier such as KD Piano Parts? Or even your local piano tuner?
https://kdpianoparts.com/shop/58-polishes---lubricant---cloths------/
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Offline pianotuner steveo

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Re: Chemical fluids
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2019, 01:30:34 PM »
The modern version of this solution is sold to piano technicians as "Protek" CLP.
We do not use the highly flammable naphtha solution anymore. You can buy Protek on eBay.

A 4oz. bottle lasts a very long time. You may apply with a hypo Oiler or even with Qtips.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2019, 01:32:45 PM by pianotuner steveo »
1960 Wurlitzer model 700 EP
1968 Gibson G101 Combo organ
1975 Rhodes Piano Bass
1979 Wurlitzer 206A EP
1980 Wurlitzer 270 Butterfly Grand
2004 Hammond XK3
2009 73A Rhodes Mark 7
2009 Korg SV-1 73
2017 Yamaha P255
2020 Kawai CA99
....and a few guitars...

Offline Fred

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Re: Chemical fluids
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2019, 09:24:22 AM »
Protek is a very good lubricant. You will need to thin it (or silicone) with alcohol to treat a sluggish Wurlitzer "electronic piano" action. 8 parts alcohol to 1 part Protek or pure silicone.
NOTE: this solution is much too aggressive for shrinking actions of acoustic pianos, as the weighting and balancing are different, and there is usually a desired degree of resistance in acoustic pianos. 
You can use denatured alcohol or 190 proof (95% alcohol) grain spirits as a substitute for naphtha. The purpose of the alcohol is to compact the fibers of the cloth bushings in the action centers, thus allowing free movement of the pins. The lubricant mixed within the solvent will leave a trace on the felt and the pin ensuring free movement.
It is recommended to treat ALL action centers to ensure an even effect across the keyboard.
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Offline marcmarc

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Re: Chemical fluids
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2019, 07:55:08 AM »
thanks to all
I guess I will get this Protek CLP then!

Offline pianotuner steveo

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Re: Chemical fluids
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2019, 08:22:21 PM »
Yes, I mix protek with denatured alcohol too for removing moisture. The other techs in the PTG looked at me funny when I told them this.
1960 Wurlitzer model 700 EP
1968 Gibson G101 Combo organ
1975 Rhodes Piano Bass
1979 Wurlitzer 206A EP
1980 Wurlitzer 270 Butterfly Grand
2004 Hammond XK3
2009 73A Rhodes Mark 7
2009 Korg SV-1 73
2017 Yamaha P255
2020 Kawai CA99
....and a few guitars...