Author Topic: What's your preference?  (Read 7429 times)

Anonymous

  • Guest
What's your preference?
« on: March 15, 2004, 10:51:04 PM »
Teflon or silicon?

Anonymous

  • Guest
Teflon or silicone
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2004, 03:32:52 AM »
Hi!
I'm not quite sure what you mean specifically, but I'd never use teflone anywhere in a Rhodes. I tend to use less and less of silicone as well. I think teflon only makes a mess and as time passes transforms into a fat and thickening dough. Silicone can be a good way to make a Rhodes play easier, but the riscs of running into double-striking is not worth it.
All my customers say that their piano feels a lot easier to play after I've serviced them, although I do not do anything more to the keyboard than just cleaning. I think the whole secret lies in proper adjustment of amplitude, dynamics and timbre.
A key that responds well feels lighter than one that produces a weak and undynamic tone.
I.m.h.o.
Best regards,
Freddan

Offline Peter Hayes

  • Vendor
  • Mark I
  • *****
  • Posts: 204
    • View Profile
    • http://www.elecedge.com
Dry Teflon
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2004, 06:29:40 AM »
I've found the dry teflon powder or the dry spray lubricant (Elmer's Slide-All) leaves no gunky residue and only makes the action faster. I use it on bushings and on key ped felt.
Peter Hayes
Electronic Edge
http://www.elecedge.com
937-767-7174

Offline Freddan

  • Sparkletop
  • ***
  • Posts: 92
    • View Profile
    • http://www.freddan.biz
What's your preference?
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2004, 02:26:41 PM »
Hi Peter, thats great information!

I do not know what kind of teflon I've run into, but I've seen some greasy, messy insides.
What's your opinion and experiences with double-striking as a result of powdering or spraying key-peds?

Thanx a lot!
Freddan
Frederik "Freddan" Adlers
Rhodes Supersite Lead Historian, Content Provider and Scandinavian Rhodes-Tech since 35 years.
Peacefreak Service Center
Molnlycke, Sweden
www.freddan.biz

Anonymous

  • Guest
What's your preference?
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2004, 05:37:23 PM »
Double striking has not been an issue in any case where I have used the teflon spray or powder.

Offline Peter Hayes

  • Vendor
  • Mark I
  • *****
  • Posts: 204
    • View Profile
    • http://www.elecedge.com
What's your preference?
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2004, 10:20:19 PM »
The post above is from Peter at Electronic Edge. Still getting used to this system.
Peter Hayes
Electronic Edge
http://www.elecedge.com
937-767-7174

Offline vicvega1972

  • Fiesta Red
  • **
  • Posts: 39
    • View Profile
What's your preference?
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2004, 08:25:04 AM »
Silicone spray was applied to the felts at the factory. After 20-30 years, they will become dried out and lose their effectiveness - as well as tear or become dislodged due to non-lubricated friction. Application of a lubricant is neccessary to maintain good health of the piano to last the next 20-30 years.

As long as your escapement is set, double bounce will not be an issue - application of a moderate amount of lube to dry felts will not induce such a scenario to begin with. Going nutso with the lube may in fact cause such problems, though. So moderation is the key.

In older piano which have felts on the hammer cam and no bump on the pedestal, double bounce may be of more concern. Doing the key ped mod (which cradles the hammer cam on contact with the tine, as well as engages the hammer with less downward force) will certainly overcome the double bounce as it relates to lubrication. But again, knowing how to set perfect escapement is a must.

I personally use Food Grade Silicone (SprayOn S00210). It is easy to apply and spreads to other surfaces nicely. I give the ped felts a quick spray, and then one shot in each of the bushings. Then the keys should dry for about 10 minutes before being put back on the frame.
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
John Della Vecchia

Mark Ross

  • Guest
Silicone spray AND intense vacuuming!
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2004, 09:41:40 PM »
Heavy silicone on key pedestals and nowhere else.

By the way - the REAL cause for double striking hammers is usually insufficent downward key travel.  If the pedastal does not elevate all the way up the the "stop-lock" position, the hammers and dampers bobble.  
If your keys are double-striking, your problem is in your REGULATION!

Mark Ross

Mad Scientist
madscientistkeyboards.com
Los Angeles, CA

Dave

  • Guest
Regulation?
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2004, 03:09:12 PM »
Sometimes yes but it depends on model and year.Hammer throw on older models plays a role.