Author Topic: Replacing the 4 pin connector  (Read 1855 times)

Offline Wavedude

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Replacing the 4 pin connector
« on: December 06, 2010, 03:46:23 PM »
I am so excited, I'm making a power supply for the original preamp. But I need some help before I start.

First, I'm changing the 4 pin connector to a 5 pin (MIDI DIN style). How do I get the original off? It's not screwed on, its actually attached very difficultly to the chassis.
And second, I have the power supply. It's a 24V DC adapter. The specs call for 25 volts, but this measures out to be just fine. Will it work? And if it's too much can the preamp handle it?
And thirdly, I understand that the vibrato is powered by 2 lamps. Does anyone know what kind they are just in the case their broken?

Thanks a bunch, I'm so ready to get this thing powered up. This is way cheaper than buying stuff through vintage vibe or something.
Fender Rhodes 88 key - Suitcase Model

Offline sean

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Re: Replacing the 4 pin connector
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2010, 08:36:50 PM »

Your connector is riveted to the name rail.  Take a hand drill, and drill out the rivets.  If the rivet is not a pop rivet, there will not be a convenient center hole to guide your drill bit.  Smack the head of the rivet to give yourself a little flat surface, and then smack it again with a center punch to make a dimple to guide your pit.

Take the name rail off the piano, then....  Take an 1/8-inch drill bit, and drill through the center of the rivet, right through the panel.  If some portion of the rivet remains, fight it with needle-nose pliers, or just pick at it with a nail. 

If you are a real brute, and you don't have a drill handy, you can sometimes break the back side of the rivet off with pliers, and then force the barrel of the rivet back through the front side of the hole.  Don't try to push with a nail, because it will spread the rivet and make it tighter.  Either use the head of a finishing nail; or clip the point off a nail, and use that.  This isn't really a nice way to treat your piano, and it is not the best way to remove the rivet cleanly.  (The drill will do a clean job.)

sean

Offline Wavedude

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Re: Replacing the 4 pin connector
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2010, 11:43:26 PM »
This isn't really a nice way to treat your piano, and it is not the best way to remove the rivet cleanly.  (The drill will do a clean job.)

Yeah, but the cool thing is, its not on the name rail it self, its on the chassis that holds the preamp circuit. But thanks for you're help! I figured out the other questions that I had by myself, so now I'm all set. Its amazing it still works and the bulbs are still operating. I cant wait to hear it. If anyone else has some advice on fixing up my preamp, it would be much appreciated, thanks :)
Fender Rhodes 88 key - Suitcase Model

Offline pianotuner steveo

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Re: Replacing the 4 pin connector
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2010, 08:31:29 PM »
24v should be fine as long as it has enough current ( amps) and the polarity is correct.


I.e. Fresh batteries have higher current than weak batteries, but the voltage is about the same.....
1960 Wurlitzer model 700 EP
1968 Gibson G101 Combo organ
1975 Rhodes Piano Bass
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1980 Wurlitzer 270 Butterfly Grand
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....and a few guitars...

Offline Wavedude

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Re: Replacing the 4 pin connector
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2010, 08:50:18 PM »
24v should be fine as long as it has enough current ( amps) and the polarity is correct.


I.e. Fresh batteries have higher current than weak batteries, but the voltage is about the same.....

Which it doesn't. See my latest post for details. And thanks.
Fender Rhodes 88 key - Suitcase Model